What is BRT?

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Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is a transportation mode that does not currently exist in metro Atlanta.

BRT is similar to rail-based transit services but uses rubber-tired vehicles to provide greater service flexibility at a lower cost. Like rail, BRT provides high quality transit service to move a large number of people quickly and efficiently to and from their destinations. Its main advantages are significantly lower capital costs than heavy rail—BRT capital costs are roughly 10% of heavy rail’s—and dramatically faster implementation timelines.

It is characterized as operating in predominately, but not necessarily exclusively, dedicated right-of-way along with other treatments to increase overall speed and reliability of service. BRT right-of-way may include a dedicated transit-only corridor, transit-only lanes adjacent to mixed traffic lanes, or mixed traffic lanes.

BRT is accessed at transit stations that are spaced every ½ to 1 mile with distinctive branding, off-board fare collection, real-time bus arrival information, and enhanced waiting areas.

Click on the image below to see typical features of BRT systems.


Example BRT Corridors:

For more info on BRT, visit: https://www.itdp.org/library/standards-and-guides/the-bus-rapid-transit-standard/what-is-brt/

Gwinnett Way, a study conducted in 2016 by the three Community Improvement Districts (CIDs) along this corridor, envisioned a potential transit future for Satellite Boulevard. Below is an image from this study.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is a transportation mode that does not currently exist in metro Atlanta.

BRT is similar to rail-based transit services but uses rubber-tired vehicles to provide greater service flexibility at a lower cost. Like rail, BRT provides high quality transit service to move a large number of people quickly and efficiently to and from their destinations. Its main advantages are significantly lower capital costs than heavy rail—BRT capital costs are roughly 10% of heavy rail’s—and dramatically faster implementation timelines.

It is characterized as operating in predominately, but not necessarily exclusively, dedicated right-of-way along with other treatments to increase overall speed and reliability of service. BRT right-of-way may include a dedicated transit-only corridor, transit-only lanes adjacent to mixed traffic lanes, or mixed traffic lanes.

BRT is accessed at transit stations that are spaced every ½ to 1 mile with distinctive branding, off-board fare collection, real-time bus arrival information, and enhanced waiting areas.

Click on the image below to see typical features of BRT systems.


Example BRT Corridors:

For more info on BRT, visit: https://www.itdp.org/library/standards-and-guides/the-bus-rapid-transit-standard/what-is-brt/

Gwinnett Way, a study conducted in 2016 by the three Community Improvement Districts (CIDs) along this corridor, envisioned a potential transit future for Satellite Boulevard. Below is an image from this study.